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Book Review: The Silent Cry by Cathy Glass

Book Cover for The Silent Cry by Cathy Glass - a girl is sitting on a swing looking up over her left shoulder at the camera

Mental Health is pervasive and Kim’s story adds to the discourse.

Regular readers of my blog know that I am in absolute love with the Cathy Glass collection. In “The Silent Cry” by Cathy Glass, mental health has a large focus and Cathy’s approach to it is amazing. As this is a book set in earlier years, I am pleased to be part of Cathy’s younger world as I am guilty of having read her books horribly out of order. I enjoy the different dynamic between Cathy and her young children, Adrian and Paula.

However, this capturing of Kim’s story is truly a story about the interconnect of relationships that each of us go through, along with the thought process that a friend has when there are clear signs that her friend is struggling. This is the first in the series that I’ve seen a disrupted and changing storyline in terms of the children that are coming into Cathy’s care. In this book, you get to experience her mainly providing respite (short term care). As she is doing this, she is also worries about Kim’s mom. Cathy’s experiences with Kim’s grandmother, which are quite cold, do little to quell her concerns.

After quite a length of time, Cathy is able to get through to the family that is covering up a mental illness. Finally, Kim’s mom receives a diagnosis of post-partum psychosis. This is a rare development that can occur after pregnancy and is treatable. After all the adults involved come together to help, Kim’s mom is on the road to recovery and health.

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Mental health is an important matter! Please ensure that you and your loved ones encourage each other to receive help when it’s needed. There are qualified, professional people in your area who are able to help by phone, email or in person.

Need help? Google “*City Name* Mental Health”. 

Book Review: Can I Let You Go? by Cathy Glass

 

Can I Let You Go? Cathy Glass

A true story about a girl named Faye.

After reading about Lucy in “Will You Love Me?”, I am hooked on Cathy Glass’ books. She creates intrigue about her career as a foster carer. I am drawn in by the histories of the children she fosters, and am inspired by her ability to work through many difficult issues with grace and dignity.

Faye’s time with Cathy is different. Cathy cares for younger children and teenagers, not adults. Faye is cognitively disabled and comes to Cathy’s care when she is in the third trimester of her pregnancy. She is like a child in many ways.

“Reassured, Faye turned her attention to what was going on outside, gazing through the window with the intrigue and wonder of a child.” (pg 71)

A lot of Cathy’s previous training and experience with younger children is used during Faye’s stay. Thankfully, Cathy’s three children (including Lucy) are older, in their late teens and 20s, and are able to help support Faye wherever they can. Cathy explains in each book that fostering is a family experience and choice. The decision to take on Faye and her baby eventually poses challenges for each of the family members and they make it through each difficulty as a team.

Spoiler alerts below!

When Faye first meets Cathy and her family, she is adamant about not referring to her baby. She is avoiding emotional attachment and prefers to avoid the topic all together. Cathy struggles with how she is going to help Faye prepare for the final trimester of her pregnancy and ultimately the delivery. Also, there’s the aspect of who-dun-it. Who is the father of the baby? Was Faye taken advantage of?

Faye continues attending her prenatal appointments and experiences changes in the baby’s physiology, she broaches the subject of wanting to keep her baby. There are concerns as to whether or not Faye would make a fit parent but those on her care team oblige with her wishes. They work diligently to have her trained and evaluated after the baby is born at a centre and take on the task of informing her grandparents and the adoptive parents of her decision.

There is little time for Faye to learn an immense amount of information that new parents are expected to. Her delivery is soon. Cathy is by Faye’s side as she goes through labour. She hopes that the new information shared and practiced with Faye has stuck. A few days after the birth, Faye confides in Cathy:

“There’s too much to learn…lots and lots of things I can’t remember.” Page 265

The reality of her ability to care effectively for her child is apparent to Faye. She agrees to go through with the original adoption.

Sounds like a happy ending for all right? Well, there’s one more plot twist but I’ll let you find out what that is.

Onto my next Cathy Glass book!

Book Review: The Farm on Nieuw Land Road:Jenna Kroon Series by Hannah Warren

Cover of The Farm on Nieuw Land Road: The Jenna Kroon Series by Hannah Warren - Review January 2017
The dynamic dancer, Jenna Kroon, is back in “The Farm on Nieuw Land Road” by Hannah Warren.

This is the second book in the Jenna Kroon series and another home run for Warren. After witnessing multiple tragedies in the first book, The Cottage on The Border, Jenna is back with her eyes open to her past and a focus on her future.

She is across the pond now, in New York, dancing with a large dance company. Jenna is surpassing her previous dance experience in Europe. She has begun to make a dramatic entrance in the American dance realm. With her hours of dedication and practice, success is inevitable. As she is preparing to complete an entrance examination to a highly coveted choreography course, she stumbles across a glimmer of friendship and struggles to open herself up to the notion that she can be likeable and, in turn, friendly to others. Jenna, as all beings are, is complex and her complexity is what makes her interesting. Grappling with the level of friendship plus her intense dedication to dance lands Jenna where she seems to consistently land, in the hospital.

Upon her discharge, Jenna decides that she is going to heal her head wound at home, at the cottage she was in during book one. This doesn’t last long and she ends up staying with the at Nieuw farm, which proves to be as adventurous.

At Nieuw Farm, Jenna discovers more about herself than her past and unearths her potential while healing, again, from an apparent eating disorder.

THWAP!

Like a shot of whiskey, Warren’s writing and storyline looks great in the light, goes down smoothly and sends heat through the body.  The second book of the trilogy hits hard. We go deeper into Jenna’s vulnerability, exposing her humanity to the cold air of reality and connection. Personally, I am perched with anticipation for the third novel in this series. Jenna is an enjoyable character and I will relish the third installation in this series.

Finally, I would like to comment on the cover art for the novel. The artwork captures the intensity of Jenna’s personality, the focal point for the book. The setting is the secondary influence to the reader’s eye. Readers will also notice that Jenna’s character is, rightfully, placed above all else.

Another solid five stars!

Format: ebook
Pages:  312
Days to Read: 8


Completed this for BookTasters. If you’d like to get free books in exchange for an honest review, they’re fabulous to work with and I highly recommend them!