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Book Review: The Toughest Prison of All by Floyd C. Forsberg

Toughest Prison of All

The Toughest Prison of All cover

Floyd C. Forsberg, bank robber and changed man, tells his story about life on the inside, outside and on some people’s bad sides. Part of the synopsis of the book is “[he] spent his time behind bars planning the biggest bank heist in history and longing for the simple love of his soul mate. When he robbed the First National Bank of Nevada in 1974, he achieved his first goal. But with a million dollars of the bank’s money in his hands and the FBI constantly on his tail, he would have to escape The Toughest Prison of All to achieve peace.”

Forsberg (or Frosty, the name of his cruder, meaner side), writes from his own perspective. He explores what it was like to plan and rob banks, escape prison and be on the run. All the while wishing for stability and a sense of normalcy. It was uncomfortable to read at first due to the retelling of his childhood and the obvious impact that would have on his future. It was uncomfortable because I wanted to root for him. I couldn’t. There were so many opportunities for Forsberg to make a change and he chose not to. A lot of people have those types of people in their lives and it is unsettling to be in their mind.

It is a bold book written with depth, capturing the attention and keeps it throughout. . Each time I remember that this is someon’es past, their history, my stomach churns. It is a true look into the American justice and prison system and there are clearly gaps within the system. A rehabilitation system. Particularly around the ability to report, investigate and punish those within the ranks, as Forsberg addresses. Overall, Toughest Prison is a decent read, with an interesting storyline and somewhat interesting characters. It’s a predictable book with a sort of happy ending and is a cautionary tale.

 

This book review was done for BookTasters. If you’d like to get free books in exchange for an honest review, they’re fabulous to work with and I highly recommend them!

Book Review: Love Letters: Extraordinary Loving for Everyday Living by Paulette Dahl

Cover of Love Letters: Extraordinary Loving for Everyday Living by Paulette Dahl - Reviewed January 2017
Love Letters: Extraordinary Loving for Everyday Living by Paulette Dahl is truly a gift from her heart to yours.

When I first read Love Letters, I ditched the suggested guide and read it cover to cover. Mainly so that I would be able to give an appropriate review on content. However, this review will cover content and experience, as I took some additional time to experience the book as recommended, by reading Letters randomly.

Reading the book in rogue style (cover to cover) tugged at my insides in a blessed way. Something within me knew that certain letters were just. Right. Dahl doesn’t back down from the darker, deeper emotions that visit each of us during the course of living. The importance of the emotional pairings demonstrates the duality of perception. Not simply that life is duality but rather, that acceptance of the emotional experience is okay. It is okay to accept grief when it comes to you. Same with depression. The Letters acknowledge these seasons in our lives, along with an appreciation for them and a line of caution about how they may impact us. There is a balance and sense of honour for each Letter, regardless of the topic. Readers will experience emotional ties to this book that they didn’t know they had and should prepare to be surprised by what arises.

Take some time with the book.

Readers should take the time to enjoy the preface of Love Letters, as it explains Dahl’s intentional use of Love as a verb (yes, with a capital L!), rearrangements and dis-section of some terms. As I was reading the preface, I was thankful for the explanation of the deliberate choices she had made in getting her point across. I am also deeply grateful for her sharing the process it took to arrive at the concept for the Love Letters.

When reading the book as intended, I arrived at the same set of letters a few times and have come to appreciate the need for constant reminders during this season of my life. I discovered that reading the Letters out loud had more impact for me. Made me read at a slower speed and really consider the communication from the Letters to me.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book. The length of the Letters is perfect (maximum of four pages) and the smaller details are well-thought out (like the hearts around the page numbers). I would recommend it for anyone who would like to look at their emotions in a different way, is looking to explore their internal world, or is curious about what Letters may let them do.

Four stars.


Completed this for BookTasters. Want to get free books in exchange for an honest review? They’re fabulous to work with and I highly recommend them!